Happy International Women’s Day!

Hello Beautiful,

Since it's International Women's Day today, let's discuss women empowerment. As you would probably know by now, I'd participated in the curation process of a couple of TED Talks a few years ago in Singapore. So what better way to address the topic of women empowerment by sharing 5 of my favourite TED Talks that advocate it. Here's a list of talks that explore the role of women, and of course, the process to elaborate and redefine what we can do to build a better future through promoting equality.

Alexis Jones founded a nonprofit called I AM THAT GIRL at the age of 19. According to her, it is a bad-ass version of scout girls for college girls to help protect women's right. She now speaks to athletes inside locker rooms about sexual harassment and how to respect the women and better protect them from abuse.

 

Crystal Martin expressed her views on a subject she had particular expertise in a meeting, and heard … crickets. Then, moments later, a man said the same things she had, and she says, “He gets a standing ovation.”

Does this scenario sound familiar? Watch this talk to learn how we can play an active role in ensuring that women in our workplaces receive the attention they deserve.

 

Layla Kasha shares her experience and her challenges moving up in her career. Life is not a zero-sum game. She feels there is nothing better than when women work shoulder-to-shoulder to win together. 

 

Reporter Gayle Tzemach Lemmon argued that women are running all types of firms-- from home businesses to major factories and they aren't micro. But why do they only get micro-loans?

Gayle attributed this phenomenon to women underestimating ourselves which led to being undervalued by others. It is time for us to aim higher when it comes to women, to invest more and to deploy our dollars to benefit women all around the world. Things will change, only when we change the way we see ourselves.

 

Reshma Saujani, the author of "Brave, Not Perfect" and founder of Girls Who Code, shared in her talk that unlike boys who are taught to be brave, most girls are taught to avoid risk, failure and embrace perfection. That socialisation of perfection has caused us to take less risks in our careers. We have to begin to undo the socialisation of perfection and encourage girls to be comfortable with their imperfection.

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PS. I can't wait to connect with you!